How the brain changes in Alzheimer’s disease: a new view

The Conversation Most people have heard of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. The disease has no cure and few, but inefficient, treatments. Despite their best efforts, doctors and researchers still don’t know the sequence of brain changes that causes this debilitating disorder. Our new study challenges a commonly held view of how Alzheimer’s disease develops, and suggests a new clinical angle to reduce its impact. Alzheimer’s disease …

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Repetitive Pointless Behaviour in Dementia

Parkinson’s disease and stimulant use: Punding and Impulse Control Disorders associated with dopaminergic agents. Repetitive behaviour, often pointless or maladaptive, occurs in association with a number of brain disorders, including dementia. One recently described example occurs as an adverse effect of the dopaminergic treatment of Parkinson’s disease or Restless Legs Syndrome. This disorder (‘the dopamine dysregulation syndrome’) has been named ‘punding’ – a term first used in Sweden for the …

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The fight against Alzheimer’s

The Project on channel 10 reported last night with PJ Lane, son of the late Don Lane, who was an Australian TV legend until his life was tragically cut short by Alzheimer’s.  Now PJ has joined a campaign to fight the devastating illness. View video HERE Research shows that being more active in life and having an active lifestyle as early in life as possible and for as long as possible reduces the risk …

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Lewy body dementia

Dr James Galvin Source: New Your Times Most people have not heard of Lewy body dementia, even many health care professionals remain unfamiliar with the disorder. Yet, “this is not an uncommon disease,” said Dr. James Galvin, a neurologist at NYU Langone Medical Center who has published extensively on the subject. He and other researchers helped the Lewy Body Dementia Association extrapolate from epidemiological surveys and come up with an …

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Gold Coast doctors join Alzheimer’s trial

Prof Philip Morris TWO Gold Coast doctors are travelling to the US to learn a controversial new treatment that offers hope to Alzheimer’s patients. Professors Stephen Ralph and Philip Morris will then take the technique to Griffith University’s Coast campus, where they will inject an anti-inflammatory drug into the neck of patients before turning them upside down. The Griffith Health Institute clinical trial, to cost about $100,000, will initially look …

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