The Reality of Preschool Anxiety Disorders

Most people think that younger children can’t have anxiety. They think that because children do not have much of a life experience, what do they have to be anxious about? The truth is very different. Almost 20% of pre-schoolers (aged 3 to 4) have an anxiety condition. Anxiety can be linked with depression and problems with behaviour and sleeping. Due to this, it is important to treat the condition as early as possible. …

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Anxiety and addiction

Anxiety In contrast to fear, which is a response to a realistic immediate danger, anxiety is a fearful response occurring in the absence of a specific danger or real threat. According to the National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing, anxiety disorders are the most common form of mental disorder in the population with a one-year prevalence of 9.7% in Australian adults. The fear and worry associated with anxiety arises in response …

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Investing in mental health pays off

Miki Perkins (May 20, 2014) Learning the piano has helped Graeme Holdsworth recover. Photo: Eddie Jim Employers urgently need to treat the mental health of their staff as seriously as their physical health and safety, according to Australia’s first campaign on mental health in the workplace. With an estimated one in five Australian workers experiencing mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety, the cost to businesses is at least $10.9 …

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Teen girls twice as likely to suffer depression than boys, research shows

Posted Thu 16 Jan 2014, 5:54pm AEDT Girls are nearly twice as likely than boys to experience bouts of depression and anxiety in their teenage years, a study by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute has found. Researchers monitored nearly 2,000 students from high schools in Victoria, between 1992 and 2008. They were each tested eight times for mental disorders, between the ages of about 15 years and 29 years. The …

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Feeling down: when does a mood become a disorder?

By Gordon Parker and Amelia Paterson We’ve all felt sad, anxious or down at one time or another, but where does the normal experience of emotion end and the clinical picture of a mood or anxiety disorder begin? Psychiatry has two widely used classificatory systems that provide definitions of “clinical” states of such emotions as differentiated from “normal” states – the World Health Organisation’s International Classification of Diseases and the …

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New mothers are anxious – not depressed

A study has found that anxiety is more common than depression among new mothers. Researchers surveyed mothers of healthy babies before birth and then followed them up at several points after birth. They found that more women suffered from anxiety than depression and that this was associated with greater use of health services and lower rates of breastfeeding. Read more at Penn State College of Medicine Related articles Postpartum Anxiety …

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Poverty, Not Mental Illness, Is Source Of Many Poor Mothers’ Anxiety: Study

Rutgers University Poor mothers are more likely to be classified as having the mental illness known as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) because they live in poverty – not because they are suffering from a psychiatric disorder, according to Rutgers researchers. Judith C. Baer, an associate professor in the School of Social Work, and her team, in the study, “Is it Generalized Anxiety Disorder or Poverty? An Examination of Poor Mothers …

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The Integration of Resolution with Recovery Principles for the Ageing Person

The “Australian National Standards for Mental Health Services 2010”, in conjunction with the “Implementation guidelines for Public Mental Health Services and Private Hospitals” both inform and guide the development and application of appropriate practices across the lifespan. Embedded within these standards are the principles of recovery which include “gaining and retaining hope, understanding of one’s abilities and disabilities, engagement in an active life, personal autonomy, social identity, meaning and purpose …

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Depression is not a normal part of ageing

Depression is not a normal part of ageing. It’s an illness that can have serious consequences if it isn’t recognised and treated. Depression is often not well recognised or detected in older people. Symptoms such as sadness, sleep and appetite problems or mood changes may be dismissed as a ‘normal’ part of ageing. These symptoms may also be confused with other conditions such as dementia. Depression can damage a person’s …

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Positive Change – Investing in Mental Health

Mental health awareness and well being strategies are urgent public concerns. Mental illness has the third highest burden of disease in Australia with approximately 45% of adults experiencing a mental illness at some stage of their lives, including alcohol or substance abuse disorders. The 13th International Mental Health Conference will focus on the complex mental issues affecting the elderly including depression, dementia, delirium, paranoid disorders and anxiety. It will also …

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