Second Opinion – Bipolar Diagnosis

As he struggled for decades with a depression that often left him despondent, Eric Wilson never thought to get a second opinion. “This might be true of many of us,” he said. “We feel we have more ownership of what we see as our body and physical health so, if a doctor gives me a diagnosis I don’t like, I’m likely to get a second opinion. It just wasn’t the …

Continue reading

Depression May Worsen Over Time in Addiction-Prone Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) by — Robert PreidtDepression symptoms increase over time for women in their 30s and 40s who are prone to addiction problems and antisocial behavior, researchers report. The new study looked at how personal history, family life and neighborhood instability affected alcoholism symptoms in 273 women over a 12-year period during their early years of marriage and motherhood. The participants lived in the U.S. Midwest. While …

Continue reading

The Occurence Of Depression Increasing During Financial Crisis Due To Income Inequalities

Due to the recent economic crisis, an increase of health inequalities between socio-economic groups has been noticed in both developed and developing countries. The World Health Organization, the World Bank and the United Nations Development Programme have all reported these inequalities and emphasized its importance and made this issue a priority. There is evidence that such inequalities not only affect general health, but have a particular impact on mental health. …

Continue reading

Youth Ask the South Australian Government Not to Close Down Eating Disorder Unit

Young people have asked the South Australian government not to risk their lives by closing an eating disorder unit. As parliament sat for the second time this year, a second protest mounted the steps of parliament house to complain about Premier Mike Rann’s government. On Monday, it was more than 50 logging trucks and a thousand people protesting plans to sell off future forestry harvests. On Tuesday, Georgia Taylor, 22, …

Continue reading

Mental illness can bring a massive paycut

Danny Rose, AAP From Sydney Morning Herald February 1, 2011 Mental illness can represent a massive pay cut, according to Australian research which has calculated its cost in forcing people to leave the workforce early. The study found people who experienced depression or other mental health problems were up to $250,000 worse off, or they had around half the accumulated wealth, compared to their healthy peers around retirement age. Professor …

Continue reading