Mental Health Workers perspectives on Rural practice

Mental health work can potentially have positive and/or negative effects on professionals. Positive effects include the mental health worker feeling positive about being able to help, an experience referred to as compassion satisfaction (Stamm, 2010). They are also at risk of experiencing emotional exhaustion or burnout, symptoms of compassion fatigue (Stamm, 2010). In addition, rural mental health workers may face stressors of professional isolation, work overload and ethical dilemmas unique …

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Rural obesity is high

Rural Obesity Stefan Juengling, The West Australian September 23, 2013, 3:33 pm A recent report has found WA residents living in rural and remote areas have higher rates of mental illness and obesity. The report, compiled by Thinktank Lateral Economics, states that people living in rural areas have less specialised support and have to deal with a greater stigma relating to mental illness. It also found the rate of obesity …

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Greens launch plan for better rural mental health

ABC Rural By Anna Vidot 21 August 2013 The Greens have launched their policy for rural mental health, calling for an additional $550 million for the sector over four years. The policy includes funding for more flexible and community-based care for regional Australians, better services, better training for people in regional communities, and better outreach programs. The eight-point plan is the result of consultations conducted by Greens mental health spokeswoman, …

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5th Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium

The Symposium Program includes 9 keynote presenters, 48 session presenters along with 4 workshops.  You will hear from these exciting and thought-provoking speakers ready to share their views on the important topic of Rural & Remote Mental Health. This Symposium will explore the challenges and effectiveness of alliances between government, NGO’s, and communities through presentations and evaluations of partnership initiatives. It will also examine “diagnosable mild to moderate mental illness” …

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How do adults with substance dependence access treatment services? A qualitative descriptive study of help-seeking and behaviour change

Adults are less likely to access health services for substance use disorders, than any other psychiatric disorder, despite high prevalence, morbidity and mortality. Comorbid substance use and psychiatric disorders cause moderate to severe illness and disability, yet only half of people diagnosed perceive the need for and then access health care. Of the people that do access treatment, many drop out or are dissatisfied with the service. This study explored …

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