Mental health is a global issue – here’s how neuroscience can cross international boundaries

By Barbara Sahakian, University of Cambridge Neuroscience holds the key to understanding the brain – and to developing more effective treatments for people with mental health disorders. But if we are to translate the many neuroscience discoveries into better brain health and well-being for people globally, we will also need strategies and official recommendations on how these findings can be implemented. In a paper published in The Lancet Psychiatry, we …

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What about the mental health of kids with intellectual disability?

By Richard Hastings, University of Warwick; Bruce Tonge, Monash University; Glenn Melvin, Monash University; Kylie Gray, Monash University, and Vaso Totsika, University of Warwick High-quality epidemiological research shows children and adolescents with intellectual disability are four times more likely to have diagnosable mental health problems compared to others their age. This mental health inequality clearly needs attention. Part of the problem is a process called diagnostic overshadowing: symptoms are incorrectly …

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Explainer: what is seasonal affective disorder?

By Caitlin Millett, Pennsylvania State University It’s that time of year again – the end of daylight savings and the beginning of the dark season. While many of us look forward to seasonal festivities, millions can also expect feelings of depression, fatigue, irritability and poor sleep. This form of mental illness, commonly known as the “winter blues”, is Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). SAD occurs most frequently in populations furthest from …

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Mental illness hurts our economy – it’s time companies got proactive

By John Mendoza, University of Sydney  Mental health disorders are the greatest contributor to the burden of disability and the third largest contributor to the burden of disease after all cancers and all cardio-vascular diseases. But unlike the progress we have made over the past 30 years in both cancer and CVD, life expectancy for people with severe mental illnesses has not improved nor has their participation in employment. At …

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DSM-5 won’t increase mental health work claims – here’s why

By Nick Glozier The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) has copped the predicted criticisms since its release on the weekend. Most centre on the idea that more of us will be diagnosed with mental disorders, as the diagnostic thresholds are lowered. Critics have also argued these thresholds will lead to an increase in claims for work-related disability or compensation, allowing more people to …

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